Funding Cancer Projects

Cancer takes a terrible emotional, physical and financial toll on those it affects. Nobody should have to face cancer alone. 

Over the years, Can4Cancer has funded incredible cancer research and support projects that make all the difference to patients, families, caregivers and communities – from the moment of diagnosis, through treatment and beyond.


Financial hardship support for Western Australians with a cancer diagnosis 

Researcher: Dr Jaclyn Smith

Institute: Cancer Council WA

This project will provide financial assistance to individuals who are in significant financial distress due to their cancer treatment. Financial support will be given to cover the cost of basic living expenses, such as electricity, gas, water, telephone or internet bills; vehicle registration or repairs; fuel costs to allow travel to treatment; and food. 


Cancer Wellness Workshops & Tai Chi for Cancer Patients

Institute: Cancer Council TAS

The Cancer Wellness Workshops program will give 60 cancer patients and carers information (from the guest speaker) and the opportunity to experience 2 taster sessions of our support programs such as yoga/Pilates/mindfulness/Bowen therapy. The taster session will give people the confidence to try a new program and also increase the opportunity of peer support as participants talk to other members of the workshop.


“When Waiting Is The Hardest Part” Refurbishment of the Oncology Outpatient waiting area for Queensland Children’s Hospital

Institute: Children’s Hospital Foundation

The waiting area for outpatient clinics is a shared space between Oncology and Medical and some families are waiting several hours before their appointment. This funding will maximise the current space and make it more comfortable for all families and most importantly, for our patients. The renovation will achieve a range of positive outcomes including:

    • Improved patient comfort from bigger and more comfortable chairs which allow children to lay down if they need to rest while waiting; 
    • Option of privacy for families who would like to be away from the main thoroughfare by adding chairs to an existing walled space;
    • Improved infection control for immune-suppressed patients by creating a separate walled area for those awaiting Bone Marrow Transplants

Bereavement Support Programs

Institute: Childhood Cancer Association 

Our  bereavement support programs provides support to parents who have lost a child to cancer,  their surviving children , and grandparents . All support is provided by our psychologists. It includes one on one counselling for the entire family,respite accommodation,and access to a range of bereavement support groups.


Patient care packs

Institute: Rare Cancers Australia

Rare Cancers Australia (RCA) exists with the dedicated purpose to improve awareness, support and treatment of Australians with rare and less common (RLC) cancers. The Patient Care Team anticipate 400 new patients in 2020 – the team work with each patient to offer them the support required for their particular diagnosis. It gives the patient and their family and friends a sense of hope when diagnosed with a rare cancer. The Patient Care Pack is a way for us to give back to the patient and the carer. With each item being personally selected by one of the Patient Care Team, the individually curated Patient Care Pack will offer the patient and carer a sense of belonging and that we are here to support them during their diagnosis and hospital stays.


Pancreatic cancer project: Targeting the Facilitator

Researcher: Zhihong Xu
Institute: Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research

Pancreatic Cancer is one of the deadliest and most difficult forms of cancer to treat - current survival rates are in the order of 6% and is expected to be the second leading cause of death by cancer by 2020. One of the reason for the poor survival rates is due to the prolific metastasising (spreading) of cancer cells that occurs from the pancreas to other parts of the body. This project will build on some exciting work already completed which has identified the role of non-malignant stromal cells in somehow contributing or facilitating this spreading of cells. The project will capture, investigate and target circulating stromal cells and cancer cells with a view to deriving new forms of treatment for this deadly disease.
Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research (IIAMR) is a world-class medical research facility rooted in Liverpool NSW, south west of Sydney. The mission of IIAMR is building the medical research centre of excellence that produces insights and discoveries for application to health and translates medical research findings into clinical practice. Cancer research is an important strategic priority of IIAMR. A number of cancer research groups are based at Ingham, including Pancreatic Research Group (Focusing on pancreatic cancer), Medical Oncology (Studying prostate, breast, colon and brain cancer), Circulating Tumour Cells research (Aiming to detect and stop cancer metastasis) and other groups conducting clinical investigations. The ultimate goal of all cancer researchers is to improve the clinical outcome of cancer patients.


Brain cancer (DIPG) in Children: Radical Treatment Response.

Researcher: Dr Kelly Avery-Kiejda
Institute: Newcastle University
Sadly, children diagnosed with DIPG (Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma) have no treatment options open to them and die of the disease. This was the case with leukaemia 50 years ago and today that disease is very treatable. In this much needed project a fresh new radical approach is being mounted which will test multiple series of drugs in combination and on an intense basis with a view to unpicking those combinations which will have an impact on this deadly form of brain cancer.


Brain Cancer (Glioblastoma) in Children: Repurposing Drugs to Starve the Cancer Cells

Researcher: Annemarie Nadort
Institute: Macquarie University
This exciting projects is also focussed on solving the treatment of glioblastoma. In this instance they are using previous work which indicated thats two specific drugs that are used for diabetes treatment and anti-scarring treatment can have a material impact on the amount of energy obtained by the cancer cells in the brain. Application of these drugs will either starve the cancer cells or paralyse them. Successful outcomes will lead to a new treatment regime to be used with children in the chemotherapy portion of their treatment plan.


Breast Cancer: Harnessing the Immune System

Researcher: Professor Sherene Loi
Institute: Breast Cancer Trials Australia
Despite advances made in targeted treatments such as Herceptin for HER2-
positive breast cancer, which are today saving thousands of lives, the majority of
women and men whose breast cancer has spread beyond the breast develop
resistance to these treatments and die from their disease. This project involves a clinical trial entitled The DIAmOND trial which will investigate whether harnessing the body’s own immune system can help fight the cancer. In the trial two specific antibodies will be added to Herceptin as treatment for metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer. The aim of this trial is to demonstrate that this combination will stop or slow down the growth of cancer, prolong lives as well as result in excellent quality of life.

Despite advances made in targeted treatments such as Herceptin for HER2- positive breast cancer, which are today saving thousands of lives, the majority of women and men whose breast cancer has spread beyond the breast develop resistance to these treatments and die from their disease. The DIAmOND trial will investigate whether harnessing the body’s own immune system can help fight the cancer. In the trial two monoclonal antibodies will be added to Herceptin as treatment for metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer. It’s hoped this combination will stop or slow down the growth of cancer, prolong lives as well as result in excellent quality of life.